The Future of Data Security Lies in the Cloud

Eyal Estrin
Cloud Security
January 14, 2021

We have recently read a lot of posts about the SolarWinds hack, a vulnerability in a popular monitoring software used by many organizations around the world.

This is a good example of supply chain attack, which can happen to any organization.

We have seen similar scenarios over the past decade, from the Heartbleed bug, Meltdown and Spectre, Apache Struts, and more.

Organizations all around the world were affected by the SolarWinds hack, including the cybersecurity company FireEye, and Microsoft.

Events like these make organizations rethink their cybersecurity and data protection strategies and ask important questions.

Recent changes in the European data protection laws and regulations(such as Schrems II)  are trying to limit data transfer between Europe and the US.

Should such security breaches occur? Absolutely not.

Should we live with the fact that such large organization been breached? Absolutely not!

Should organizations, who already invested a lot of resources in cloud migration move back workloads to on-premises? I don't think so.

But no organization, not even major financial organizations like banks or insurance companies, or even the largest multinational enterprises, have enough manpower, knowledge, and budget to invest in proper protection of their own data or their customers’ data, as hyperscale cloud providers.

There are several of reasons for this:

  1. Hyperscale cloud providers invest billions of dollars improving security controls, including dedicated and highly trained personnel.
  2. Breach of customers' data that resides at hyperscale cloud providers can drive a cloud provider out of business, due to breach of customer's trust.
  3. Security is important to most organizations; however, it is not their main line of expertise.
    Organization need to focus on their core business that brings them value, like manufacturing, banking, healthcare, education, etc., and rethink how to obtain services that support their business goals, such as IT services, but do not add direct value.

Recommendations for managing security

Security Monitoring

Security best practices often state: "document everything".
There are two downsides to this recommendation: One, storage capacity is limited and two, most organizations do not have enough trained manpower to review the logs and find the top incidents to handle.

Switching security monitoring to cloud-based managed systems such as Azure Sentinel or Amazon Guard​Duty, will assist in detecting important incidents and internally handle huge logs.

Encryption

Another security best practice state: "encrypt everything".
A few years ago, encryption was quite a challenge. Will the service/application support the encryption? Where do we store the encryption key? How do we manage key rotation?

In the past, only banks could afford HSM (Hardware Security Module)for storing encryption keys, due to the high cost.

Today, encryption is standard for most cloud services, such as AWS KMS, Azure Key Vault, Google Cloud KMS and Oracle Key Management.

Most cloud providers, not only support encryption at rest, but also support customer managed key, which allows the customer to generate his own encryption key for each service, instead of using the cloud provider's generated encryption key.

Security Compliance

Most organizations struggle to handle security compliance over large environments on premise, not to mention large IaaS environments.

This issue can be solved by using managed compliance services such as AWS Security Hub, Azure Security Center, Google Security Command Center or Oracle Cloud Access Security Broker (CASB).

DDoS Protection

Any organization exposing services to the Internet (from publicly facing website, through email or DNS service, till VPN service), will eventually suffer from volumetric denial of service.

Only large ISPs have enough bandwidth to handle such an attack before the border gateway (firewall, external router, etc.) will crash or stop handling incoming traffic.

The hyperscale cloud providers have infrastructure that can handle DDoS attacks against their customers, services such as AWS Shield, Azure DDoS Protection, Google Cloud Armor or Oracle Layer 7 DDoS Mitigation.

Using SaaS Applications

In the past, organizations had to maintain their entire infrastructure, from messaging systems, CRM, ERP, etc.

They had to think about scale, resilience, security, and more.

Most breaches of cloud environments originate from misconfigurations at the customers’ side on IaaS / PaaS services.

Today, the preferred way is to consume managed services in SaaS form.

These are a few examples: Microsoft Office 365, Google Workspace (Formerly Google G Suite), Salesforce Sales Cloud, Oracle ERP Cloud, SAP HANA, etc.

Limit the Blast Radius

To limit the "blast radius" where an outage or security breach on one service affects other services, we need to re-architect infrastructure.

Switching from applications deployed inside virtual servers to modern development such as microservices based on containers, or building new applications based on serverless (or function as a service) will assist organizations limit the attack surface and possible future breaches.

Example of these services: Amazon ECS, Amazon EKS, Azure Kubernetes Service, Google Kubernetes Engine, Google Anthos, Oracle Container Engine for Kubernetes, AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, Google Cloud Functions, Google Cloud Run, Oracle Cloud Functions, etc.

Summary

The bottom line: organizations can increase their security posture, by using the public cloud to better protect their data, use the expertise of cloud providers, and invest their time in their core business to maximize value.

Security breaches are inevitable. Shifting to cloud services does not shift an organization’s responsibility to secure their data. It simply does it better.

The original post can be found here.

Eyal Estrin

Eyal Estrin

Information Security and Cloud Architect, IsraelClouds Analyst, public columnist, #CISSP, #CCSP, #CISM, #CISA, #CCSK


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